Summary/ImplicationsSummarize your main findings and point out how your clinical question was answered or not answered; what were the gaps in the research; and possible new inquiryclinical question : How does participation in play impact obesity in children?I attach the 3 articles_______________________________________________________________
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1. Programming Obesity and Poor Fitness: The Long-term Impact of Childhood Television……………………… 1
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Programming Obesity and Poor Fitness: The Long-term Impact of Childhood Television
Author: Erik Landhuis, C; Poulton, Richie; Welch, David; Hancox, Robert J
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Abstract (Abstract): Objective:To assess whether the long-term effects of childhood television viewing on BMI
and cardiorespiratory fitness are mediated by adult viewing.Methods and Procedures:This prospective study
included an unselected birth cohort of 1,037 participants (535 men) born in Dunedin, New Zealand in
1972/1973. Hours of television viewing on weekdays were reported at ages 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, and 32 years.
BMI and cardiorespiratory fitness were measured at age 32 years.Results:Both childhood and adult television
viewing times were significantly associated with higher BMI and lower cardiorespiratory fitness at age 32 years.
Childhood television viewing was a better predictor of adult BMI and fitness than adult viewing and remained a
significant predictor of these outcomes after adjusting for adult viewing time. After adjusting for adult viewing,
the odds (95% confidence interval) of adult obesity increased by a factor of 1.25 (1.01, 1.53) and poor fitness
increased by a factor of 1.40 (1.16, 1.70) for each hour of mean weekday television viewing during
childhood.Discussion:The association between childhood television viewing and obesity and poor fitness in
adulthood is not mediated by adult viewing. The detrimental health effects of watching too much television
during childhood persist into adulthood. Attempts to reduce adult obesity and poor fitness by modifying
television viewing habits need to begin in childhood.
Abstract: To assess whether the long-term effects of childhood television viewing on BMI and cardiorespiratory
fitness are mediated by adult viewing.
This prospective study included an unselected birth cohort of 1,037 participants (535 men) born in Dunedin,
New Zealand in 1972/1973. Hours of television viewing on weekdays were reported at ages 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15,
and 32 years. BMI and cardiorespiratory fitness were measured at age 32 years.
Both childhood and adult television viewing times were significantly associated with higher BMI and lower
cardiorespiratory fitness at age 32 years. Childhood television viewing was a better predictor of adult BMI and
fitness than adult viewing and remained a significant predictor of these outcomes after adjusting for adult
viewing time. After adjusting for adult viewing, the odds (95% confidence interval) of adult obesity increased by
a factor of 1.25 (1.01, 1.53) and poor fitness increased by a factor of 1.40 (1.16, 1.70) for each hour of mean
weekday television viewing during childhood.
The association between childhood television viewing and obesity and poor fitness in adulthood is not mediated
by adult viewing. The detrimental health effects of watching too much television during childhood persist into
adulthood. Attempts to reduce adult obesity and poor fitness by modifying television viewing habits need to
begin in childhood.
MeSH: Adolescent, Adult, Body Mass Index, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Habits, Humans, Male, Predictive
Value of Tests, Prospective Studies, Time Factors, Life Style (major), Obesity — physiopathology (major),
Physical Fitness — physiology (major), Television (major)
Publication title: Obesity
Volume: 16
Issue: 6
Pages: 1457-9
Number of pages: 3
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Publication year: 2008
Publication date: Jun 2008
Year: 2008
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Place of publication: Silver Spring
Country of publication: United Kingdom
Publication subject: Physical Fitness And Hygiene, Medical Sciences
ISSN: 19307381
Source type: Scholarly Journals
Language of publication: English
Document type: Journal Article
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.205
Accession number: 18369346
ProQuest document ID: 1030420992
Document URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1030420992?accountid=35796
Copyright: Copyright Nature Publishing Group Jun 2008
Last updated: 2014-08-16
Database: Health & Medical Collection,Public Health Database,Family Health Database
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1. Obesity and Occupational Therapy………………………………………………………………………………………………..
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Obesity and Occupational Therapy
Author: Reingold, Faryl Saliman, OTD, OTR/L; Jordan, Katie, OTD, OTR/L
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Publication title: The American Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume: 67
Issue: 6
Supplement: Supplement
Pages: S39-S46
Number of pages: 8
Publication year: 2013
Publication date: Nov/Dec 2013
Year: 2013
Publisher: American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
Place of publication: Bethesda
Country of publication: United States
Publication subject: Medical Sciences, Occupational Health And Safety
ISSN: 02729490
Source type: Scholarly Journals
Language of publication: English
Document type: General Information
ProQuest document ID: 1502697555
Document URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1502697555?accountid=35796
Copyright: Copyright American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. Nov/Dec 2013
Last updated: 2014-02-27
Database: Nursing & Allied Health Database,Health Management Database,Health & Medical Collection
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1. Occupational Therapy Services in the Promotion of Health and the Prevention of Disease and Disability.
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Occupational Therapy Services in the Promotion of Health and the Prevention of Disease and
Disability
Author: Scaffa, Marjorie E, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Van Slyke, Nancy, EdD, OTR, FAOTA; Brownson, Carol A,
MSPH
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MeSH: Humans, Life Style, Primary Prevention — organization & administration, United States, Disabled
Persons — rehabilitation (major), Health Promotion (major), Health Services (major), Occupational Diseases -prevention & control (major), Occupational Therapy — organization & administration (major), Occupational
Therapy Department, Hospital — organization & administration (major)
Corporate/institutional author: American Occupational Therapy Association Commission on Practice
Publication title: The American Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume: 62
Issue: 6
Pages: 694-703
Number of pages: 10
Publication year: 2008
Publication date: Nov/Dec 2008
Year: 2008
Publisher: American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
Place of publication: Bethesda
Country of publication: United States
Publication subject: Medical Sciences, Occupational Health And Safety
ISSN: 02729490
Source type: Scholarly Journals
Language of publication: English
Document type: Journal Article
Accession number: 19024747
ProQuest document ID: 231977558
Document URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/231977558?accountid=35796
Copyright: Copyright American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. Nov/Dec 2008
Last updated: 2014-03-20
Database: Nursing & Allied Health Database,Health Management Database,Health & Medical Collection
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