EECS3221 Section E
Operating System Fundamentals

Fall 2020
Project

Organizational, Structural, Logical and Execution Relationships Between
Important System

Components in Linux Kernel Subsystems
Due Date: Monday October 19, 2020, 23:59.

A. Description of the Project

You are required to study the important system components, including important data
structures, important functions and algorithms, and the various organizational, structural,
logical and execution relationships between them, in one or more subsystems of the
Linux kernel which provide some basic kernel functionality and clearly explain them.

An important requirement is that you should try to draw as many as possible of your own
diagrams, which illustrate, as many as possible of the following information:

A1. The names of the fields that connect the various data structures.
A2. Examples of data values in the various data structures which show their logical and
structural connections.
A3. Which part of the system they belong, or are executed in. For example, kernelspace/
user-space; in-memory/on-disk; kernel-mode/user-mode, etc.
A4. Organizational and structural relationships.
A5. Logical relationships.
A6. Flow of execution and/or decision making.
A7. Changes in data values and/or organization structure at different stages of execution.
A8. Any other organizational, structural, logical and execution relationships between the
system components that may aid understanding of any important aspect of the
subsystem(s).

B. Examples of Diagrams of Linux Kernel Components and Their Relationships

Example 1. The diagram illustrating the Linux system structure in Figure 2.13 on page 83
of “Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This diagram illustrates A4.

Example 2. The diagram illustrating a tree of processes on a typical Linux system in
Figure 3.7 on page 116 of “Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This diagram
illustrates A2 and A6.

Example 3. The diagram illustrating process creatiion using the fork() system call in
Figure 3.9 on page 119 of “Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This diagram
illustrates A2 and A6.

Example 4. The diagram illustrating in-memory file-system structures. (a) file open. (b)
file read in Figure 14.3 on page 569 of “Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This
diagram illustrates A3, A4, A6 and A7.

Example 5. The diagram illustrating the UNIX inode in Figure 14.8 on page 577 of
“Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This diagram illustrates A4.

Example 6. The diagram illustrating interrupt protection levels in Linux in Figure 20.2 on
page 794 of “Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This diagram illustrates A4.

Example 7. The diagram illustrating slab allocator in Linux in Figure 20.5 on page 797 of
“Operating System Concepts” 10th Edition. This diagram illustrates A4.

Example 8. The diagram illustrating memory layout for ELF programs in Linux in Figure
20.6 on page 802




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